How To Make Horchata – A Refreshing Mexican Rice Drink With Cinnamon By Rockin Robin

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My Horchata Recipe is a refreshingly delicious rice based Mexican drink made with milk, cinnamon, sugar and vanilla extract. Served over ice and a dusting of ground cinnamon will quench your thirst.
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Horchata is an easy drink to make but you do need to start 24 hours before you intend to drink it. Other than that it is very easy to make.

There are many versions of horchata depending on it’s country of origin. For example, the version from Spain uses tigernuts, water and sugar.

Latin America has many different variations. For Mexico, which is the version I am making, it’s rice, cinnamon, and vanilla.

Other ingredients that may be used are almonds, cashews, sesame seed, and peanuts. Some versions use milk, condensed milk, and evaporated milk. And some don’t. It’s really all over the place in terms of ingredients used.

Like I said I’m using the Mexican version sometimes called agua de horchata. Here are the ingredients:

1 1/4 cup long grain white rice
3 cups water
1 cup milk
1/4 cup half and half
3 cinnamon sticks
1/3 cup sugar
1 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract

Directions:
Place the rice into a blender, or coffee grinder and blend to just break up the rice into smaller pieces.

Pour the rice into a strainer and rinse with cold water until the water runs clear. Place the rice in a container and add the water and cinnamon sticks.

Place in the refrigerator for 24 hours.

Strain the liquid water into another container/pitcher. Discard or save the rice for another use.

Add the milks, sugar, and vanilla to the water/cinnamon mixture. Stir until the sugar is completely dissolved.

Pour horchata over ice into your favorite glass and dust with ground cinnamon. Enjoy!

WARNING: I tried making this recipe where you blend the rice and cinnamon completely in the blender after it soaked over night. The result was horrible. After two attempts of straining with a fine strainer and cheese cloth, I could not get rid of the chalky taste and had to throw it out.

My advice is to NOT blend the water, rice and cinnamon and then try to strain it.

Just soak the rice and cinnamon and strain that and it will be awesome. Just make sure you soak it over night to really infuse the flavors.

Here is my rice pudding recipe for that left over rice: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YA4ggIF9leY

Click here for my playlist of drinks you may enjoy! http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLrvAwHGrBMttPzCquEyejt7BgwrO9FZ3X
Thanks for watching!
Rockin Robin
P.S. Please help me spread the word about my channel and website by sharing my content on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, Google Plus and any other social media you like to use. It’s as simple as copying and pasting this link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V9vuxzi6FVw

Music by Kevin MacLead http://incompetech.com/.
License terms:
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Comments

Rain Retribute says:

hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhorchata

Elizabeth Wilson says:

That rinse is a travesty… dont be afraid of sustenance..that 'light dusting' of cinnamon looked like the cinnamon challenge

Jaime Garcia says:

American People, the arroz con leche, the churros, the horchata etc are ancient spanish receap, not mexican food. Introducing for the spanish

Jaime Garcia says:

Mrs, the real horchata is valencia, spain, your origin place, date 12 century, is a symbol to valencia

monexmeldrick says:

It's a drink of Spanish origin

AbsintheMoon XIII says:

Horchata is from Valencia, Spain, not originally from Mexico. They use tigernuts or "Chufas" instead of rice. The Mexican version is also very delicious!

Roger Dana says:

This is not the real horchata

Joyce Jordan says:

I drank Horschata for the first time when I traveled to Houston, TX in August. It was one of fountain drinks available at some of the mini markets. I loved it but it is pretty much unknown in Kansas so I'm glad to have the recipe.

King BM says:

My mouth is getting watery just by watching this, every time I go to a Mexican restaurant I always get horchata and tacos 😂💖

William says:

Ty……I have this drink from time to time when I make it to a taco shop, which is little further away being we have moved…..anyways, its my alternative to caffeine drinks. I love them and decided I must learn how. I really like your videos and that you have so much experience in making authentic Mexican foods. Thanks again!

David Juan Conejero says:

Horchata is valencian

Hannah Chaffin says:

I just wanted to say, I made this for my Spanish class for a project and everyone loved it and wanted seconds! thank you so much!

David says:

Why are people from Spain so butthurt over this recipe? It makes your culture look really petty. I guess that is where Puerto Rico got it from. Food does not follow borders. A country can not own a dish. Drinking sweeting rice porridge is not like creating the internet. It is also done in Asia.

Chances are your cherished state drink came from Asia most likely India where the rice and spices are from. In China they make it with soy beans. In Sri Lanka they make it with tea. In Canada it is made from powdered drink mix with aspartame.

You sound like arabs having a meltdown when an Israeli is making a pita or any dish they thought only their culture ate. "The Jews are steeling and taking credit for our food!" So stop acting like jealous children or adult muslims from the middle east and start thinking more American.
It is great that another nation so far from me enjoys the same tasty flavors. Not saying: no that's mine, if your not brown you have no right to make this, or you making it wrong(which is really funny because it is her frigging recipe!).

Look at one of the most world famous cuisine, Italian. They were taught to make pasta(noodles) from Chinese. Then a few hundred years ago tomatoes were introduced from the Americas and had a huge impact. Peru does not bitch about tomatoes being stolen, at least not that I have heard.

Gail B. says:

Robin, I see some recipes call for adding evaporated milk and sweetened condensed milk. How would you tweak this recipe using one or both in addition to whole milk?

Agustin's Boutique says:

you're supposed to leave the rice in the water with cinnamon sticks overnight covered blend the rice in the water import into another container if you strain out the rice you lose the flavor and you use sweetened condensed milk or La Leche..

Beats User says:

I'm mexican and this is my version.

INGREDIENTS

2 cups dry long grain rice

3 cups water

1 cinnamon stick

1 tablespoon vanilla extract

1/2 cup sugar

1 can evaporated milk

DIRECTIONS

Soak the rice in the 3 cups of water with the cinnamon stick, overnight or for at least 6 hours.

After resting, place the mixture into a blender and add the evaporated milk, sugar and vanilla extract, and blend until smooth.

Strain the liquid through a fine sieve a few times to remove any grittiness. Serve over ice and garnish with a cinnamon stick or ground cinnamon on top.

Bee Medina says:

for people saying shes white and doesn't know because shes not Mexican grow up . im mexican and I know how to make a white American burger ! its called learning has nothing to do with skin

Amobeatles says:

Robin thank you so much ! My son loves this recipe . Thank you for sharing it , you are the best !

Caroline Banh says:

I drink this everyday afterschool and its taste really good!

Kattelyn Cabrera says:

How does she know how to do them she ain't Mexican I am

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